Atmospheric Chemistry of Chlorine and Sulfur Compounds:

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Published by way of the yank Geophysical Union as a part of the Geophysical Monograph Series.

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In this way, both gasescouldbe measured that the peroxidemethodis simple,direct, and with one run and it worked very well. I wonder we get results. That is what we are interested in. if this has been tried elsewhere. Dr. Airsbullet--You say that nitrogen oxides Dr. Morris B. Jacobs--There have been methods in literature similar to that. But that was, of course, for higher concentrationsthan those we worked with. 2 of a part per million, about one hundred times as much. For that reason we run them in constitute an interference.

A. BRICLIO,ANI)J. A. BROCKMAN, dioxide as disulfitomercurate (II) and subseInstrument for continuoustitration, Anal. , quent colorimet,'icestimation, Anal. , 28, 20, 1008-1014, 1948. 1816-1819, 1956. STANFORD RESEARCtI INSTITUTE,The smog problem WInstoN, B. , AN• F. J. ead peroxide,Y. Soc. Chem. , 5•, Angeles, distributed by the Western Oil and 385-388, 1934. , Los Angeles, 1954. Discussion Dr. Chr. E. Junge--Have you any comments Dr. Jacobs--Yes, we did. At first when Dr. •S simultaneously? We have nitrogen oxidesof the order of two parts per hundred million, occasionallyas high as nine parts per hundredmillion,and we foundthat nitrogendioxide interfered witIx West's method.

3 35 formed, and the iodometric method also determines other reducing substancesin the atmosl•here. But on a day when one has high pollution, they might very well be appreciableand sothey, too, would think one can really expectany sulfur trioxide to be presentin our atmosphere. Onehas prob- is dissolvedin the water 'and forms sulfate, you numbers of particles. Dr. Eriksson--I was speaking of sulfur tri- ably to remove all the water first and all the particulate matter, becauseit is so reactive.

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